Google’s Restructuring As Alphabet Could Lead To Greater Awareness Of New gTLDs

Google Alphabet logo

[originally published 13/8; see note below] Google’s announcement this week that it is restructuring under a new company setup called Alphabet could lead to a greater awareness for new gTLDs.

The announcement was, as the New York Times reported, “short on details about how the new structure will work.” But one part of the restructure that is clear is the new corporate domain is abc.xyz, and Microsoft quickly registered the domain abc.wtf, which redirects to Bing, in response.

The .xyz gTLD easily has the most domains registered, albeit in somewhat controversial circumstances due to Network Solutions having given away the .xyz equivalent to many of its .com registrants.

But the gTLD is closing in on 1.170 million registrations according to nTLDstats.com, and close to a third are through Network Solutions. Meaning that regardless it would still be easily the largest of the new gTLDs as it has around three times as many registrations as the next biggest of the new gTLDs, .网址 (.website), with close to 379,000 registrations.

Daniel Negari, who founded .XYZ, the registry operator for the gTLD, told Wired he believes it could be a game changer.

Negari told Wired the surprise news about Alphabet may dispel concerns about search rankings and shift the thinking about gTLDs. “Obviously, Google believes in it if they’re rebranding on .xyz,” he told Wired after the news of Alphabet and its new URL broke. “This is the ultimate validation.”

The news wasn’t bad for business, either: .XYZ normally gets 3,000 new registrations per day. On the day of the announcement, Negari said they were on track to get 10,000.

In the original interview for Wired, Negari said “we end the alphabet in ‘xyz’ and we should end domain names the same way.” After Google’s announcement Negari said “I guess now Google ends Alphabet with xyz, too.”

As for the future, Google can’t get the alphabet.com as it’s owned by BMW and they’ve said they don’t intend to sell it. And Google will have their very own .google domain, which they could use when it’s operational.

This post originally appeared on 13 August, but due to a glitch was deleted along with several other posts. So here it is, reposted.