Daily Wrap: Community .GAY Applicants Rejected, Again; Aust Govt Objects to .FOOD and ICANN54 Roundups

DOT GAY LLC gTLD logoThe application for the .gay gTLD by community group Dot Gay LLC has once again been rejected because… they aren’t gay enough. But it appears that commercial groups wanting to operate the gTLD will be OK. The bid by Dot Gay was rejected because “its application did not cover a sufficient number of gay people”, an appeal was won and it’s been rejected again a year later.

The result was the same and the reason, Kieren McCarthy writes, was “the evaluation team decided the application did not sufficiently cover a community. But this time the reason was the complete opposite – that it was trying to cover too many gay people.”

It’s a bizarre and tortuous journey for Dot Gay and points to the application system being loaded against community groups and in favour of those with the money and resourced.

The Australian government has got involved in the new gTLD application for .food, being “among those asking ICANN deny a request to make .food a ‘closed generic’ gTLD,” according to Domain Incite.

“Eight people have filed comments opposing Lifestyle Domain’s application for Specification 13 status for its .food registry contract, which would allow the company to keep all .food domains for itself,” the report says.

The ICANN meeting has come and gone, and there have been a few roundups of what happened in recent days.

Don Hollander wrote an article on Universal Acceptance discussions at the 54th meeting held in Dublin for Centr. Universal Acceptance, Hollander writes, is “the idea that all domain names will work equally well in all applications” and he notes it “made material progress during the ICANN54 meeting in Dublin.”

FairWinds Partners, a consultancy and lobby group, published their ICANN 54 Review while APNIC’s Paul Wilson wrote his Reflections on ICANN 54.

RIPE published their review of the meeting, ICANN 54: Addressing the Accountability Question, and Milton Mueller wrote “Transition is a noun, not a verb: Thoughts on the Dublin ICANN meeting” where he noted “the Dublin meeting was not a train wreck. That much we can say. My assessment of ICANN 54 is not, to put it mildly, as chirpy as that of the Internet Society CEO, but it is more objective and nuanced. Insofar as progress on the transition is concerned, the deliberations among the CCWG, the GAC and the ICANN board averted a rupture that would have jeopardized the transition. But it did so primarily by caving in to the board-promulgated fears of creating a membership, and by side-stepping contentious issues. There are still a lot of loose ends.”

The IE Domain Registry (IEDR) has published some research noting that “over a third (37%) of Irish SMEs still do not have a website or any online presence whatsoever.” The research also found “91% of Irish SMEs cannot process sales online and 54% do not have websites optimised for mobile browsing, were outlined this morning at the launch of Ireland’s first ever ‘Internet Day’ at the CHQ Building.”