.NZ DNC News Update: Upcoming Domain Abuse Forum and Framework Policy Review

.NZ’s Domain Name Commission has published its monthly update for October with news on its Domain Name Abuse Forum in November and that it is currently seeking submissions as part of their Framework Policy Review 2018.

The Domain Name Abuse Forum next month has Justice Minister Andrew Little opening the event. Numbers are restricted to 100 people for this free, one-day event bringing together lawyers and law enforcement, internet safety and security experts, government departments, academics and more. Attendees will work together to identify issues surrounding domain name abuse, understand the issues more clearly, and identify the best course of action to deal with these challenges.

InternetNZ is currently seeking submissions as part of their .nz Framework Policy Review 2018. The .nz Framework Policy requires updating to reflect the new structure implemented as part of the Organisational Review of 2017. Roles and responsibilities previously assigned to NZ Registry Services in the old organisation structure need to be reassigned to InternetNZ. The review is technical in nature and does not extend to the principles underpinning the operation of .nz.

In other news for New Zealand’s country code top level domain (ccTLD) manager, there’s an update on InternetNZ’s participation at ICANN63 in Barcelona where Jordan Carter was elected as the Asia-Pacific representative on the CCNSO Council that had thus far been held by former Domain Name Commissioner Debbie Monahan. There’s also an update on ICANN63 that InternetNZ staff attended, including the Government Advisory Committee’s (GAC) biannual High Level Government Meeting Session. The ccNSO meeting received updates from various working groups, including one on the retirement of ccTLDS. “The group achieved consensus on the process to retire a ccTLD. The trigger event is the removal of the ccTLD from the ISO 3166-1 list. The group agreed that the subsequent retirement period before removal from the root zone should be in the range of 3-10 years following the trigger event.”

There’s also updates on Domain Name Commission staff attending The Crossroads Conference 2018 in Auckland that brought together local and international experts, and focused on putting the online safety sector ahead of the technology curve. Attendees heard presentations on a range of topics based around promoting online safety, disrupting online harm, and protecting and educating children. Plus InternetNZ’s inaugural digital annual report was shortlisted year in the annual report category of the Plain English Awards.

The October DNC Newsletter is available in full from:
https://www.dnc.org.nz/the-commission/news/1745